Warren Commission (01 of 26): Hearings Vol. I (of 15)

Warren Commission (01 of 26): Hearings Vol. I (of 15)

Author:
United States. Warren Commission
Author:
United States. Warren Commission
Format:
epub
language:
English

%title插图%num
Author: United States. Warren Commission
Kennedy
John F. (John Fitzgerald)
1917-1963 — Assassination
Oswald
Lee Harvey
Warren Commission (01 of 26): Hearings Vol. I (of 15)
Transcriber’s note: A three-page list of Exhibit numbers has been omitted from this eBook.
Cover created by Transcriber and placed in the Public Domain.

INVESTIGATION OF
THE ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY

HEARINGS
Before the President’s Commission
on the Assassination
of President Kennedy

Pursuant To Executive Order 11130, an Executive order creating a Commission to ascertain, evaluate, and report upon the facts relating to the assassination of the late President John F. Kennedy and the subsequent violent death of the man charged with the assassination and S.J. Res. 137, 88th Congress, a concurrent resolution conferring upon the Commission the power to administer oaths and affirmations, examine witnesses, receive evidence, and issue subpenas
Volume
I
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D.C.


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, WASHINGTON: 1964
For sale in complete sets by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402


PRESIDENT’S COMMISSION
ON THE
ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY

Chief Justice Earl Warren, Chairman

  • Senator Richard B. Russell
  • Senator John Sherman Cooper
  • Representative Hale Boggs
  • Representative Gerald R. Ford
  • Mr. Allen W. Dulles
  • Mr. John J. McCloy
  • J. Lee Rankin, General Counsel
  • Assistant Counsel
  • Francis W. H. Adams
  • Joseph A. Ball
  • David W. Belin
  • William T. Coleman, Jr.
  • Melvin Aron Eisenberg
  • Burt W. Griffin
  • Leon D. Hubert, Jr.
  • Albert E. Jenner, Jr.
  • Wesley J. Liebeler
  • Norman Redlich
  • W. David Slawson
  • Arlen Specter
  • Samuel A. Stern
  • Howard P. WillensA
  • Staff Members
  • Phillip Barson
  • Edward A. Conroy
  • John Hart Ely
  • Alfred Goldberg
  • Murray J. Laulicht
  • Arthur Marmor
  • Richard M. Mosk
  • John J. O’Brien
  • Stuart Pollak
  • Alfredda Scobey
  • Charles N. Shaffer, Jr.

Biographical information on the Commissioners and the staff can be found in the Commission’s Report.

A Mr. Willens also acted as liaison between the Commission and the Department of Justice.


Foreword

On November 29, 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Executive Order No. 11130, creating a Commission “to ascertain, evaluate and report upon the facts relating to the assassination of the late President John F. Kennedy and the subsequent violent death of the man charged with the assassination.” By the same Executive order, the President appointed seven Commissioners: Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States; Richard B. Russell, Democratic Senator from Georgia; John Sherman Cooper, Republican Senator from Kentucky; Hale Boggs, Democratic Congressman from Louisiana and House Majority Whip; Gerald R. Ford, Republican Congressman from Michigan; Allen W. Dulles, former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency; and John J. McCloy, former High Commissioner of Germany. The President designated Chief Justice Warren as the Commission’s Chairman. The findings of the Commission, based on an examination of all the facts, are set forth in the separate volume entitled “Report of the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy.”
An essential part of the investigation conducted by this Commission has been the securing of sworn testimony from witnesses possessing information relevant to the inquiry. This testimony has been taken under the authority of Senate Joint Resolution 137 (88th Cong., 1st sess.), enacted by Congress on December 13, 1963, which conferred upon the Commission the power to administer oaths and affirmations, examine witnesses, receive evidence, and issue subpenas. Under the procedures adopted by the Commission, some witnesses have appeared before members of the Commission, others have been questioned under oath on depositions by members of the staff, and others have provided affidavits to the Commission. Beginning with its first witness on February 3, 1964, the Commission under these procedures took the testimony of approximately 550 witnesses and received more than 3,100 exhibits into evidence.
The testimony and exhibits obtained by the Commission are printed in this and the succeeding volumes, organized in the following order:

(1)   Testimony before members of the Commission, in the order in which it was taken.
(2)   Testimony by sworn deposition or affidavit, grouped into four general subject categories; the medical attention given to the President and the Governor, identification of the assassin of President Kennedy, the background of Lee Harvey Oswald, and the killing of Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack L. Ruby on November 24, 1963.
(3)   Exhibits introduced in connection with the testimony before the Commission in numerical order.
(4)   Exhibits introduced in connection with sworn depositions and affidavits, grouped alphabetically by name of witness.
(5)   Other exhibits introduced before the Commission in numerical order.

The transcripts of this testimony, prepared by qualified court reporters, were reviewed by members of the Commission staff and, in most instances, by the witness concerned. Editing of the transcript prior to printing in these volumes was confined to correction of stenographic errors and punctuation, and minor changes designed to improve the clarity and accuracy of the testimony. In the few cases indicated, brief deletions have been made of material which might be considered in poor taste and is clearly irrelevant to any facet of the Commission’s investigation. All the original transcripts prepared by the court reporters, of course, have been preserved and will be available for inspection under the same rules and regulations which will apply to all records of this Commission.
Each volume contains a brief preface discussing the contents of the volume. In addition, each volume of testimony contains a table of contents with the names of the witnesses whose testimony appears in the volume, and the numbers of the exhibits introduced in connection with that testimony. Each volume of exhibits contains a table of contents with short descriptions of the exhibits reproduced in the volume. Volume XV contains a name index setting forth all references to persons (other than Lee Harvey Oswald) appearing in the Hearings volumes and an index setting forth all references to Commission exhibits and Deposition exhibits in these volumes.


Preface

The testimony of the following witnesses is contained in volume I: Mrs. Marina Oswald, the widow of Lee Harvey Oswald; Mrs. Marguerite Oswald, Oswald’s mother; Robert Edward Lee Oswald, Oswald’s brother; and James Herbert Martin, who acted for a brief period as Mrs. Marina Oswald’s business manager.


Contents

  Page
Foreword v
Preface vii
Testimony of—
Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald 1
Mrs. Marguerite Oswald 126
Robert Edward Lee Oswald 264
James Herbert Martin 469

COMMISSION EXHIBITS INTRODUCED


Hearings Before the President’s Commission
on the
Assassination of President Kennedy

Monday, February 3, 1964
TESTIMONY OF MRS. LEE HARVEY OSWALD

The President’s Commission met at 10:35 a.m. on February 3, 1964, at 200 Maryland Avenue NE., Washington, D.C.
Present were Chief Justice Earl Warren, Chairman; Senator John Sherman Cooper, Representative Hale Boggs, Representative Gerald R. Ford, and Allen W. Dulles, members.
Also present were J. Lee Rankin, general counsel; John M. Thorne, attorney for Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald; William D. Krimer and Leon I. Gopadze, interpreters.
The Chairman. Well, Mrs. Oswald, did you have a good trip here?
The Commission will come to order, and at this time, I will make a short statement for the purpose of the meeting. A copy of this statement has been given to counsel for Mrs. Oswald, but for the record, I should like to read it.
On November 29, 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued Executive Order No. 11130 appointing a Commission “to ascertain, evaluate, and report upon the facts relating to the assassination of the late President John F. Kennedy, and the subsequent violent death of the man charged with the assassination.”
On December 13, 1963, Congress adopted Joint Resolution S.J. 137 which authorizes the Commission, or any member of the Commission or any agent or agency designated by the Commission for such purpose to administer oaths and affirmations, examine witnesses, and receive evidence.
Mr. Rankin. Mr. Chairman, excuse me, the interpreter——
The Chairman. I understood they have a copy and if they want to at the end he may do that.
On January 21, 1964, the Commission adopted a resolution authorizing each member of the Commission and its General Counsel, J. Lee Rankin, to administer oaths and affirmations, examine witnesses, and receive evidence concerning any matter under investigation by the Commission.
The purpose of this hearing is to take the testimony of Mrs. Marina Oswald, the widow of Lee Harvey Oswald who, prior to his death, was charged with the assassination of President Kennedy. Since the Commission is inquiring fully into the background of Lee Harvey Oswald and those associated with him, it is the intention of the Commission to ask Mrs. Marina Oswald questions concerning Lee Harvey Oswald and any and all matters relating to the assassination. The Commission also intends to ask Mrs. Marina Oswald questions relating to the assassination of President Kennedy and the subsequent violent death of Lee Harvey Oswald.
Mrs. Marina Oswald has been furnished with a copy of this statement and a copy of the rules adopted by the Commission for the taking of testimony or the production of evidence. Mrs. Marina Oswald has also been furnished with a copy of Executive Order No. 11130 and Congressional Resolution S.J. Res. 137 which set forth the general scope of the Commission’s inquiry and its authority for the examining witnesses and the receiving of evidence.
The Chairman. Mrs. Oswald, do you have an attorney, a lawyer?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes.
The Chairman. And your lawyer is Mr. Thorne?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes.
The Chairman. He is the only lawyer you wish to represent you here?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes.
The Chairman. And may I ask you, Mr. Thorne, if you have received a copy of this?
Mr. Rankin. Mr. Chairman, that is the copy he received there.
Mr. Thorne. I have read a copy of it, Mr. Chief Justice, yes, sir.
The Chairman. Are there any questions about it?
Mr. Thorne. There are no questions.
The Chairman. Very well.
Very well, we will proceed to swear Mrs. Oswald as a witness.
Will you please rise, Mrs. Oswald.
(The Chairman administered the oath to the witness, Mrs. Oswald, through the interpreter.)
The Chairman. Mr. Reporter, will you rise, please, and be sworn.
(The Chairman administered the oath to the interpreter and the stenotype reporter, following which all questions propounded to the witness and her answers thereto, were duly translated through the interpreter.)
The Chairman. Now, Mr. Thorne and Mrs. Oswald, I want to say to you that we want to see that Mrs. Oswald’s rights are protected in every manner and you are entitled to converse with her at any time that you desire. You are entitled to give her any advice that you want, either openly or in private; if you feel that her rights are not being protected you are entitled to object to the Commission and have a ruling upon it, and at the conclusion of her testimony if you have any questions that you would like to ask her in verification of what she has said you may feel free to ask them.
After her testimony has been completed, a copy will be furnished to you so that if there are any errors, corrections or omissions you may call it to our attention, is that satisfactory to you?
Mr. Thorne. Very satisfactory, Mr. Chairman.
The Chairman. I might say also to her we propose to ask her questions for about 1 hour, and then take a short recess for her refreshment, and then we will convene again until about 12:30. At 12:30 we will recess until 2 o’clock, and then we may take her to her hotel where she can see her baby and have a little rest, and we will return at 2 o’clock, and we will take evidence until about 4:30. If at any time otherwise you should feel tired or feel that you need a rest, you may feel free to say so and we will take care of it.
Mrs. Oswald. Thank you.
The Chairman. The questions will be asked of you by Mr. J. Lee Rankin, who is the general counsel of the Commission.
I think now we are ready to proceed, are we not, Mr. Rankin?
Mr. Rankin. Mrs. Oswald, you be at your ease, and the interpreter will tell you what I ask and you take your time about your answers.
Will you state your name, please?
Mrs. Oswald. Marina, my name is Marina Nikolaevna Oswald. My maiden name was Prussakova.
Mr. Rankin. Where do you live, Mrs. Oswald?
Mrs. Oswald. At the present time I live in Dallas.
Mr. Rankin. And where in Dallas?
Mrs. Oswald. Mr. Thorne knows my address.
Mr. Thorne. 11125 Ferrar Street, Dallas, Dallas County, Tex.
Mr. Rankin. Do you live with friends there?
Mrs. Oswald. I live with Mr. Jim Martin and his family.
Mr. Rankin. Mrs. Oswald, do you have a family?
Mrs. Oswald. I have two children, two girls, June will be 2 years old in February, and Rachel is 3 months old.
Mr. Rankin. Are you the widow of the late Lee Harvey Oswald?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes.
Mr. Rankin. Mrs. Oswald, did you write in Russian a story of your experiences in the United States?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes, I have. I think that you are familiar with it.
Mr. Rankin. You furnished it to the Commission, did you not, or a copy of it?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes.
Mr. Rankin. Will you describe for the Commission how you prepared this document in Russian that you furnished to us?
Mrs. Oswald. I wrote this document not specifically for this Commission, but merely for myself. Perhaps there are, therefore, not enough facts for your purpose in that document. This is the story of my life from the time I met him in Minsk up to the very last days.
Mr. Rankin. And by “him” who did you mean?
Mrs. Oswald. Lee Harvey Oswald.
Mr. Rankin. Did you have any assistance in preparing this document in Russian?
Mrs. Oswald. No, no one.
Mr. Rankin. Are all the statements in that document true insofar as you know?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes.
Mr. Rankin. Since your husband’s death and even back to the time of the assassination of President Kennedy, you have had a number of interviews with people from the Secret Service and the FBI, have you not?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes, I did.
Mr. Rankin. We have a record of more than 46 such interviews, and I assume you cannot remember the exact number or all that was said in those interviews, is that true?
Mrs. Oswald. I don’t know how many there were.
Mr. Rankin. As far as you can recall now, do you know of anything that is not true in those interviews that you would like to correct or add to?
Mrs. Oswald. Yes, I would like to correct some things because not everything was true.
Mr. Rankin. Will you tell us——
Mrs. Oswald. It is not just that it wasn’t true, but not quite exact.
Mr. Rankin. Do you recall some of the information that you gave in those interviews that was incorrect that you would like to correct now? Will you tell us that?
Mrs. Oswald. At the present time, I can’t remember any specific instance, but perhaps in the course of your questioning if it comes up I will say so.
Mr. Rankin. Do you recall the date that you arrived in the United States with your husband, Lee Harvey Oswald?
Mrs. Oswald. On the 13th of June, 1962—I am not quite certain as to the year—’61 or ’62, I think ’62.
Mr. Rankin. How did you come to this country?
Mrs. Oswald. From Moscow via Poland, Germany, and Holland we came to Amsterdam by train. And from Amsterdam to New York by ship, and New York to Dallas by air.
Mr. Rankin. Do you recall the name of the ship on which you came?
Mrs. Oswald. I think it was the SS Rotterdam but I am not sure.
Mr. Rankin. What time of the day did you arrive in New York?
Mrs. Oswald. It was—about noon or 1 p.m., thereabouts. It is hard to remember the exact time.
Mr. Rankin. How long did you stay in New York at that time?
Mrs. Oswald. We stayed that evening and the next 24 hours in a hotel in New York, and then we left the following day by air.
Mr. Rankin. Do you recall the name of the hotel where you stayed?
Mrs. Oswald. I don’t know the name of the hotel but it is in the Times S

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