The Mormon Prophet and His Harem / Or, An Authentic History of Brigham Young, His Numerous Wives and Children

The Mormon Prophet and His Harem / Or, An Authentic History of Brigham Young, His Numerous Wives and Children

Author:
C. V. Waite
Author:
C. V. Waite
Format:
epub
language:
English

%title插图%num
Author: Waite, C. V. (Catherine Van Valkenburg), 1829-1913
Mormon Church
Young
Brigham
1801-1877
The Mormon Prophet and His Harem
Or, An Authentic History of Brigham Young, His Numerous Wives and Children

THE MORMON PROPHET
AND
HIS HAREM;
OR,
AN AUTHENTIC HISTORY OF BRIGHAM YOUNG,
HIS
NUMEROUS WIVES AND CHILDREN.

BY
MRS. C. V. WAITE.

——”And with a piece of scripture,
Tell them,—that God bids us do good for evil.
And thus I clothe my naked villainy
With old odd ends, stol’n forth of Holy Writ,
And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.”

FOURTH EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED.

CAMBRIDGE:
Printed for the Author; and Sold by Subscription.
J. S. GOODMAN AND COMPANY,
5 Custom House Place, Chicago.
1867.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1866, by
Catharine V. Waite,
In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States for the Second
Judicial District of the Territory of Idaho.

RIVERSIDE, CAMBRIDGE:
STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY
H. O. HOUGHTON AND COMPANY.


PREFACE.

No apology is offered for presenting to the public the only authentic account of Brigham Young, of his polygamous family, and of that complicated and incongruous system of social and political machinery, called Mormonism.
The only form of religion in this country which refuses to conform either to the spirit of progress and improvement and enlightened humanity which characterizes the age in which we live, or to our laws and the genius of our free institutions,—drawing constantly from foreign countries hosts of votaries, impelled hither not by a love of republicanism, but rather by a desire to exchange a political for a religious monarchy,—is Mormonism, which presents an antagonism to our Government, and can scarcely fail to result in national trouble.
The elements of a second rebellion are in active progress in Utah, and, as in the case of the slavery rebellion, the great danger lies in failing to place a proper estimate upon the power of those elements for mischief, and to take the proper precautions in time. Religious fanaticism is more active, and, when hostile, more dangerous, than political ambition; hence the arrogant and intolerant spirit, and the bitter hostility of the Mormons, are more worthy the serious attention of our statesmen than would be the opposition of so many mere political traitors.
Again; their power for mischief is much increased by the position they occupy upon the great thoroughfare between the eastern and western portions of our country.
It is with the view of calling the attention of the Government and of the people of the country to the dangerous character of this monarchy growing up in the midst of the Republic, that the political history of Utah has been written.
The chief interest of the work, however, with a large class of readers, will doubtless consist in the information it contains, relative to the family and social relations of the celebrated Mormon leader. These, and all other facts contained in this volume, may be relied upon as true, and many of them are now published for the first time.
The subject of polygamy is treated thoroughly, and as dispassionately as the writer’s utter abhorrence of the system will permit. A residence of two years in the midst of this state of society, could not fail to afford me a tolerably good view of its inside workings, and this view I have presented to my readers.
Some of the facts narrated in this volume have been furnished by persons in Salt Lake, who are thoroughly conversant with them; in some cases, by persons who have long been in the service of Young, and know whereof they relate. While I am not at liberty to mention their names, I take this opportunity to return them my thanks for such valuable information.
This book is believed to be a desideratum demanded by the social and political well-being of the country, and as such it is presented to the consideration of the people of this country, and especially to my own sex, who are deeply interested in preventing the framework of our social system from being broken up and superseded by the customs and maxims of the worst ages of barbarism.
To the suffering women of Utah, I especially dedicate this result of my labors in their behalf; and I am not without hope that many of them may, upon a perusal of its pages, be induced to retrace their steps, and rescue themselves from the snares of the religious impostors now seeking their destruction.


CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
EARLY HISTORY OF BRIGHAM YOUNG.
PAGE
The Birth and Parentage of Brigham Young.—His Brothers and Sisters.—He embraces Mormonism, and becomes a Leader.—Is appointed President of the Twelve, and finally placed at the Head of the Church, to succeed Joseph Smith.—Establishes the Mormons in Salt-Lake Valley. 1
CHAPTER II.
POLITICAL.
Brigham as Governor of Utah and Superintendent of Indian Affairs.—Formation of the State of Deseret.—Proceedings of the Utah Legislature.—Brigham’s Proclamations.—Difficulties with the Federal Officers.—Proceedings of the First Judges. 11
CHAPTER III.
POLITICAL HISTORY CONTINUED.
Colonel Steptoe and Brigham Young.—Brigham reappointed Governor.—John F. Kinney.—Western Utah, or Nevada.—Letter of Hon. James M. Crane.—Judge Stiles and the Records.—W. W. Drummond. 26
CHAPTER IV.
POLITICAL HISTORY CONTINUED.—THE MORMON WAR.
Report of the Secretary of War.—Proclamation of Governor Brigham Young, declaring Martial Law.—Correspondence.—Sermons of Young and Kimball.—Proclamation of Governor Cumming.—His Echo Canyon Adventures.—Col. Kane.—The Mormons leave Salt Lake.—Commissioners appointed by the President.—Peace restored. 40
CHAPTER V.
POLITICAL HISTORY CONTINUED.
The Mountain Meadow Massacre, and other Crimes of the Mormons.—Attempts to bring the Perpetrators to Justice.—Doings of Judge Cradlebaugh.—Governor Cumming and the Military Officers.—Judge Sinclair’s Court.—Governor Dawson and his Misfortunes.—New Governor and Associate Justices appointed. 60
CHAPTER VI.
POLITICAL HISTORY CONTINUED.
Arrival of the New Federal Officers, in July, 1862.—Colonel Connor arrives with his Command.—The Message of Governor Harding.—The Mormons Indignant.—The Legislature refuse to print the Message.—Action of the United States Senate thereon.—Forgery in the Mormon Legislature.—Bill of Judge Waite to amend the Organic Act.—Indignation Meeting.—Governor Harding and Judges Waite and Drake requested to leave the Territory.—Their Replies.—Brigham.—The Federal Officers. 78
CHAPTER VII.
BRIGHAM AS PRESIDENT OF THE CHURCH.
Organization of the Mormon Church.—Functions of the various Officers.—The Two Priesthoods.—Mode of treating Dissenters or “Apostates.”—Divisions in the Church.—The Gladdenites.—History of the Morrisites.—The Josephites.—Return to the True Mormon Church. 114
CHAPTER VIII.
BRIGHAM AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE CHURCH.
Nature of the Trusteeship.—The Tithing System.—Brigham’s Private Speculations.—The Emigration Fund.—The Hand-Cart Company. 132
CHAPTER IX.
BRIGHAM AS PROPHET, SEER, AND REVELATOR.
Brigham’s Position as Head of the Church.—Mormon Theology.—Brigham’s Theology, or Utah Mormonism.—Adam as God.—Brigham Young as God.—Human Sacrifice.—Introduction of Polygamy.—Polygamy no part of the Original Mormon Religion.—The Revelation, or Celestial Marriage.—The Ceremony of Sealing.—Consequences and Incidents of the Doctrine.—Incest.—Summary of the Mormon Religion. 153
CHAPTER X.
BRIGHAM AS LORD OF THE HAREM.
Brigham’s Block.—The Lion House.—The Tithing-House.—The Bee-Hive House, Office, etc.—Description of the Harem.—Plan, Rooms, etc., of each Floor, and who occupies the same.—Life at the Harem.—Brigham at Home. 177
CHAPTER XI.
THE WIVES OF BRIGHAM YOUNG.
Mary Ann Angell Young, the first wife.—Her Family.—Lucy Decker Seely, the first wife in Plurality.—More of “My Women”: Clara Decker, Harriet Cook, Lucy Bigelow, Twiss, Martha Bowker, Harriet Barney, Eliza Burgess, Ellen Rockwood, Susan Snively, Jemima Angell, Margaret Alley, Margaret Pierce, Mrs. Hampton, Mary Bigelow, Emeline Free, or the Light of the Harem.—Proxy Women: Miss Eliza Roxy Snow, Zina D. Huntington, Amelia Partridge, Mrs. Cobb, Mrs. Smith, Clara Chase, the Maniac.—Amelia, the last love.—The Prophet in love the Thirtieth Time. 191
CHAPTER XII.
POLYGAMY.
Condition of Woman among various Heathen Nations.—Influence of Christianity.—Mormonism and Woman.—Brigham offers to set the Women Free.—Arguments in Favor of Polygamy.—The Argument against it.—Abraham and Sarah.—Appeal to Mormon Women.—Their Unhappy Condition.—Evil Effects of the System.—Illustrations. 215
CHAPTER XIII.
THE ENDOWMENT.
A Mormon Drama. 244
CHAPTER XIV.
BRIGHAM AS GRAND ARCHEE OF THE ORDER OF THE GODS.
Organization of the Order of the Archees.—The Grand Archees.—The Archees.—The Danites.—Organization of Brigham’s Celestial Kingdom.—Doctrine of Adoption.—Case of Dr. Sprague.—Description of Leading Danites: Bill Hickman, Porter Rockwell, Robert T. Burton.—Affidavits. 261
CHAPTER XV.
RECENT EVENTS.—CONCLUSION.
Personal Appearance and Character of Brigham Young.—His Aims and Purposes.—Solution of the Mormon Question.—New Complications.—Military Reviews of Mormons.—Governor Durkee.—Counteracting Influences.—The Mines and Miners.—Rev. Norman McLeod.—The “Salt Lake Vedette.”—Administration of General Connor.—Murder of Brassfield.—Order of Young for the Expulsion of the Gentiles.—Order for the Murder of Eighty Men.—Difficulties concerning the Public Lands.—Murder of Dr. Robinson.—The Gentiles flee in Terror.—The Government fails to protect its Officers and Citizens.—The Hero of Three Wars of the Republic hunted through the Territory.—Rev. Mr. McLeod warned not to return to Utah.—The Reign of Terror commenced.—The Gentiles call for Help. 273


THE MORMON PROPHET


CHAPTER I.
EARLY HISTORY OF BRIGHAM YOUNG.

The Birth and Parentage of Brigham Young.—His Brothers and Sisters.—He embraces Mormonism, and becomes a Leader.—Is appointed President of the Twelve, and finally placed at the Head of the Church to succeed Joseph Smith.—Establishes the Mormons in Salt Lake Valley.
Brigham Young was born at Whitingham, Windham County, Vermont, June 1, 1801. A short sketch of the family of this noted adventurer may not be uninteresting. The following extract is from his autobiography:—

“My grandfather, John Young, was a physician and surgeon in the French and Indian war.
“My father, John Young, was born March 7, 1763, in Hopkinton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was very circumspect, exemplary and religious, and was, from an early period of his life, a member of the Methodist Church. At the age of sixteen he enlisted in the American Revolutionary War, and served under General Washington; he was in three campaigns in his own native State, and in New Jersey. In the year 1785 he married Nabby Howe, daughter of Phineas and Susannah, whose maiden name was Goddard.
“In January, 1801, he moved from Hopkinton to Whitingham, Windham County, Vermont, where he remained for three years, opening new farms.
“He moved from Vermont to Sherburn, Chenango County, New York, in 1804, where he followed farming, enduring many hardships and privations, incidental to new settlements.
“My father’s family consisted of five sons and six daughters, viz.:—
“Nancy, born in Hopkinton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, August 6, 1786.
“Fanny, born in the same place, November 8, 1787.
“Rhoda, born in Platauva District, New York, September 10, 1789.
“John, born in Hopkinton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, May 22, 1791.
“Nabby, born in same place, April 23, 1793.
“Susannah, born in same place, June 7, 1795.
“Joseph, born in the same place, April 7, 1797.
“Phineas Howe, born in same place, February 16, 1799.
“Brigham, born in Whitingham, Windham County, Vermont, June 1, 1801.
“Louisa, born in Sherburn, Chenango County, New York, September 25, 1804.
“Lorenzo Dow, born in same place, October 19, 1807.”

It is worthy of remark, that all of Brigham’s family became Mormons. His father, John Young, was constituted first patriarch of the church, and died at Quincy, Illinois, October 12, 1839. His brothers are all at Salt Lake, and are the devoted followers and satellites of the Prophet.
Through the plurality system, the Youngs have formed connections so numerous, that almost half the people at Salt Lake are in some way related to the ruling dynasty. This is striking evidence of Brigham’s ingenuity in consolidating and perpetuating his power.
His early life was that of a farmer’s son, but he afterwards acquired the trade of a painter and glazier, which he followed until his conversion to Mormonism. In 1832, being then thirty-one years of age, he heard and embraced this new religion. He was convinced by Samuel H. Smith, brother to the prophet Joseph, and was baptized by Eleazer Miller, now living at Salt Lake.
Brigham “gathered” with the saints, at Kirtland, Ohio, and soon became intimate with Joseph Smith. He was ordained an elder, and began preaching. His shrewdness, and almost intuitive knowledge of character, soon attracted the attention of his brethren, and gave him influence and position in this weak and despised church. They recognized in him a man born to rule and lead the masses. They were attracted by his strong, electrical will; and from that time his power in the church has been undisputed.
In 1835, on the 14th of February, at Kirtland, Brigham Young was ordained one of the newly-organized quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Armed with his new power, and fired with a zeal worthy of a better cause, he went forth, and preached and proselyted with marked success.
Thomas B. Marsh having apostatized, Brigham was chosen to succeed him, as President of the Twelve Apostles, in 1836.
Then came the dark days of Mormonism. Many of the prominent men of the church apostatized. The saints were driven from Kirtland. Smith fled to save his life; Brigham accompanied him, and after many hair-breadth escapes, many trials and hardships, they again planted a new colony, and settled in Far West, Missouri.
But the saints were destined again to endure persecution for their faith. In a few years they were driven from Missouri, seeking a home this time in Illinois. During all this time Brigham stood firm, counselling and directing his brethren, and, like the rock amid the storms, gathering fresh power of resistance as the waves of persecution increased in fury.
In 1839 he was appointed, with others, to “open up the gospel” to the inhabitants of the British Isles. They landed at Liverpool on the 6th of April, 1840, and immediately commenced preaching. Brigham superintended affairs, issued an edition of the “Book of Mormon,” and commenced the publication of the “Millennial Star,” a periodical still living. In 1841 he sailed for New York, having shipped seven hundred and sixty-nine of the faithful, and leaving many churches, with organizations completed.
Brigham was cordially received by Smith, and the saints generally, who appreciated and acknowledged his services, and it was evident that his influence and fame were rapidly increasing.
In 1844 the whole aspect of affairs was changed. Smith was shot, Nauvoo threatened by a mob, and the Twelve Apostles scattered. Sidney Rigdon assumed the Presidency, he being Smith’s first counsellor. Divisions were numerous, and the church was in imminent danger of falling into hopeless ruin.
Brigham, with true Napoleonic foresight, saw his opportunity, and was not slow to improve it. He came hurriedly to Nauvoo, denounced Rigdon as an impostor and his revelations as emanations from the Devil, cut off both him and his adherents from the true church, cursed Rigdon, and “handed him over to the buffetings of Satan for a thousand years,” and was himself elected President by an overwhelming majority.
This exhibition of energy silenced all opposition. Those who did not love, feared him; and all suffered themselves to be led, because they dared not resist, a man so determined to rule.
Thus much accomplished, and visions of future power and aggrandizement, perchance of temporal sovereignty, floated through the brain of this modern Mohammed. He dreamed of the kingly robe and the jewelled crown in some far-off valley of the Rocky Mountains, where gentiles or their laws could not annoy the saints, or hinder the normal development of Mormonism. How and in what manner these dreams came so near fulfilment, will be seen as the reader peruses these pages.
But he did not lose sight of the present in these glowing visions of the future. He completed the Temple, the Mansion-House was in a forward state, Nauvoo was increasing rapidly, and with it his power and popularity.
Brigham, however, with his usual foresight, saw the storm arising. The saints were again to be driven. So he hurried the people through their endowments, bound them to him by oaths which made them shudder to recall, and still, by an art equal to that of Loyola, so inwound himself in their affections that they loved and reverenced him the more. He aroused their deepest hatred toward the “gentiles;” wrought upon their pride, ambition, and revenge, until they were ready to do and dare anything for their religion and their leader. When his power was thus fully establi

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