The Crystal Palace: Its Architectural History and Constructive Marvels

The Crystal Palace: Its Architectural History and Constructive Marvels

Author:
Jr. Charles Fowler
Author:
Jr. Charles Fowler
Format:
epub
language:
English

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Author: Berlyn, Peter
Crystal Palace (Great Exhibition
1851
London
England)
The Crystal Palace: Its Architectural History and Constructive Marvels

Transverse Section of the Building, showing the Interior completed.


PREPARING FOR PUBLICATION BY

JAMES GILBERT, 49 PATERNOSTER ROW,

(UNIFORM WITH THE PRESENT VOLUME),

BY

PETER BERLYN, ESQ.


TO HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS PRINCE ALBERT,

DESCRIPTIVE OF

THE ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTIVE MARVELS OF

OF ART, SCIENCE, AND MANUFACTURE,

ARE, BY PERMISSION, MOST HUMBLY DEDICATED,

AS A SLIGHT TRIBUTE

OF THE ADMIRATION AND GRATITUDE

WHICH, IN COMMON WITH THE WHOLE CIVILIZED WORLD,

ARE AMPLY SHARED IN BY

HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS’S

MOST DEVOTED, FAITHFUL, AND OBEDIENT SERVANT,

 THE PUBLISHER.


PAGE.
Introductory Remarks 1
Committee for all Matters relating to the Building 2
Labours of the Building Committee 3
The Competition Designs 6
Buildings used for Previous Exhibitions in France, Germany, and England 15
Description of the Building Committee’s Design 21
Opposition to this Design 24
The Tenders 24
History of Mr. Paxton’s Design 27
General Description of the Building 33
The Paxton’s Gutters 40
The Sash-bars 44
The Ridges 46
The Glass 46
The Box Gutters 47
The Roof Girders 47
The Iron Drilling Machine 49
The Punching Machine 50
The Adzing and Planing Machine 51
The Columns and Connecting-pieces 52
The Base-pieces 53
The Cast-iron Girders 54
The Galleries 55
Testing the Cast-iron Girders 55
Roof of Transept 58
The Facework 59
The Diagonal Bracing 60

The Staircases

60
The Floor and Foundations 62
First Operations on the Ground 63
Setting-out the Ground 64
Fixing the Base-plates 65
Henderson’s Derrick Crane 67
Raising and Fixing the Columns and Girders 68
Hoisting the Roof Trusses 69
Provision for Expansion of Girders 70
Glazing the Roof 71
Stage for Repairing the Glass, etc. 73
Hoisting the Ribs for Transept Roof 73
Glazing the Transept Roof 76
The Painting 76
The Hand-rail Machine 78
General View of the Works 79
Paying the Workmen 80
General Statistics 82
The Parti-coloured Painting 83
The Water Supply 87
The Stability of the Building 87
Testing the Galleries 88
General Advantages of the Building 89
Conclusion 89
Appendix:—
List of Competitors for the Building i
List A.—Competitors Entitled to Favourable Mention vi
List B.—Competitors Entitled to Further Higher Honorary Distinction viii
The Two Competition Designs Specially Mentioned by the Building Committee ix
Memorandum on The Site xi
Report of the Royal Commissioners, Presented to her Majesty on the Opening of the Building xvii
PAGE.
Transverse Section of the Building, showing the Interior completed frontispiece.
Plan of the Building for the French Exposition in 1849 16
View of the Principal Entrance of the same 17
Interior View of the “Palace” 18
Interior View of the Cattle-shed 19
View of Kroll’s Wintergarten at Berlin facing 19
Plan of Kroll’s Wintergarten 20
View of the Birmingham Exposition Building 20
Ground-plan of the Design of the Building Committee facing 22
Exterior View of the same facing 24
Common Mode of Glazing Roofs 28
Method by Ridge and Furrow 29
Cutters of Mr. Paxton’s Sash-bar Machine 30
The Victoria Regia House, Chatsworth 32
Interior of the same 33
Ground-plan of the Building for the Exhibition 34
View of one 24-feet square Bay of Roof partly completed 36
Portion of the Lower Storey of the Principal Elevations 37
View of the Interior of the Transept facing 38
View of Glass Roof from the Lead Flat facing 39
General View of the Building from the South-West facing 40
The External Railing 40
Section of the Paxton’s Gutter, with the Strong Sash-bar 41
The Circular Planing Machine 41
Portion of the same showing Detail 41
Sections of the Paxton’s Gutter, showing different Stages in the Machine 42
The Gutter-cutting Machine 42
Machine for finishing Ends of Gutters and Ridges 43
Machine for Cutting out Sash-bars 44
The Sash-bar Drilling Machine 45
Portion of the same, Enlarged 46
Section of the Ridges, etc 46
Diagram of 48-feet Girder 48

Diagram of 72-feet Girder

48
The Iron Drilling Machine 50
The Punching Machine and Shears 50
The Adzing-cutters 51
The Adzing and Planing Machine 52
Section of a Column 52
A Base-piece 54
View of the Interior from the level of Galleries facing 55
Frame and Hydraulic Press for testing the Girders 56
Interior View of the Central Avenue towards the West facing 58
Louvre Frame 60
View of Staircase 61
Fixing Cast-iron Drain-pipe 62
View of Crane and Proving-press 66
Henderson’s Derrick Crane 67
Portions of the same 67
Fixing the Girders 68
General View of the Works in Progress facing 69
Hoisting the 72-feet Trusses 70
Glazing-waggon for Flat Roof 72
A Pair of Ribs prepared for raising 74
Hoisting the Ribs for the Transept Roof facing 75
Stage for Glazing Transept Roof 76
The Sash-bar Painting Machine 77
Portion of the same in Detail 77
The Hand-rail Cutting Machine 78
Portion of the same 78
The Brass Tickets for Workmen 80
The Interior of the Pay-office 81
The Men taking their Wages 81
The Workmen waiting to be Paid 82
View of the Building from the North Bank of the Serpentine facing 86
Testing an Experimental Bay of the Gallery Floor facing 88
View of the Boiler-house, etc. facing 88
View of South Front of the Building 92
 Appendix:—
Exterior View of Mons. Horeau’s Design for the Building facing ix
Interior of the same facing ix
View of Exterior from one end of Messrs. Turners’ Design for the Building facing ix
Transverse Section and View of the Interior of the same facing ix

O much has already been said and written, both wisely and well, upon the marvellous edifice which has just been reared with such magical rapidity to enshrine the results of the skill and industry of all nations, that it would appear an almost hopeless task to present the subject in any new point of view to the reader.

If, therefore, the authors cannot lay claim to novelty or originality in the execution of the pleasurable work which they have undertaken, they are not without hopes that, from their having been connected with this gigantic undertaking during the greater part of its progress, they will be enabled to trace in a more detailed and consecutive manner than has yet been attempted the history of the design and execution of the building up to the period of its completion.

A great deal has been lately said upon the want of distinctive character in almost all the buildings of the present day; and it is certainly a striking fact that in scarcely any of our important modern structures does the exterior appearance in any way lead the spectator to form an idea of the purposes or arrangement of the interior, the former being apparently governed by fancy, or the fashion for some particular style, while the latter only, is accommodated to the peculiar requirements of the case. Thus we have porticos which do not shelter from the weather, or in which no one is allowed to walk; Venetian palaces appear piled upon a substructure of plate-glass; baronial castles prove to be model prisons; and richly-decorated mansions, from the time of “Good Queen Bess,” or fanciful Italian villas, are

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