Frank Merriwell’s Son; Or, A Chip Off the Old Block

Frank Merriwell’s Son; Or, A Chip Off the Old Block

Author:
Burt L. Standish
Author:
Burt L. Standish
Format:
epub
language:
English

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Author: Standish, Burt L., 1866-1945
Adventure stories
Frank Merriwell’s Son; Or, A Chip Off the Old Block

Frank Merriwell’s Son

OR,
A CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK

BY
BURT L. STANDISH

Author of the famous Merriwell Stories.

STREET & SMITH CORPORATION
PUBLISHERS
79-89 Seventh Avenue, New York
Copyright, 1906
By STREET & SMITH
Frank Merriwell’s Son
(Printed in the United States of America)
All rights reserved, including that of translation into foreign languages, including the Scandinavian.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER I. A NEW LIFE.
CHAPTER II. THE BIRTHMARK.
CHAPTER III. ON THE VERANDA.
CHAPTER IV. A MAID OF MYSTERY.
CHAPTER V. THE SURPRISE.
CHAPTER VI. THE FACE IN THE WATCH.
CHAPTER VII. A BLACK SAMSON.
CHAPTER VIII. THE SUBSTITUTES.
CHAPTER IX. SPARKFAIR’S HIT.
CHAPTER X. A MOONLIGHT MEETING.
CHAPTER XI. THE TRUTH.
CHAPTER XII. A HEART LAID BARE.
CHAPTER XIII. THE PLEDGE OF FAITH.
CHAPTER XIV. THE SIGNAL FOR SILENCE.
CHAPTER XV. KIDNAPED!
CHAPTER XVI. FOR THE SAKE OF OLD DAYS.
CHAPTER XVII. A CALL TO THE “FLOCK.”
CHAPTER XVIII. A MAN OF THE PEOPLE.
CHAPTER XIX. AN INTRUDER.
CHAPTER XX. OLD FRIENDS EN ROUTE.
CHAPTER XXI. AT MERRY HOME.
CHAPTER XXII. ANOTHER PILGRIM.
CHAPTER XXIII. IN THE NOOK.
CHAPTER XXIV. ON THE CLIFF.
CHAPTER XXV. A STARTLING DISCOVERY.
CHAPTER XXVI. A LIVELY GAME.
CHAPTER XXVII. MURILLO’S FAREWELL.
CHAPTER XXVIII. A COMPACT.
CHAPTER XXIX. THE PROOF.
CHAPTER XXX. THE EDUCATED HORSE.
CHAPTER XXXI. A CHALLENGE.
CHAPTER XXXII. A HARD PROPOSITION.
CHAPTER XXXIII. THE VOICE OF THE TEMPTER.
CHAPTER XXXIV. A TROUBLED MIND.
CHAPTER XXXV. REMORSE.
CHAPTER XXXVI. A FRIEND WORTH HAVING.
CHAPTER XXXVII. A PROTEST.
CHAPTER XXXVIII. A CONFESSION.
CHAPTER XXXIX. JOLTS FOR BULLIES.
CHAPTER XL. A DETERMINED FRONT.
CHAPTER XLI. THE HOUR AND THE MAN.

FRANK MERRIWELL’S SON.

CHAPTER I.

A NEW LIFE.

Lizette, the French nurse, came softly and lightly down the stairs and found Frank Merriwell pacing the library floor, while Bart Hodge and Elsie Bellwood talked to him soothingly.
“Madame will see you now, saire,” said the nurse, with a little curtsy. “Ze doctaire he is gone now some time. Madame she is comforterbill. She say she see you—alone.”
Frank was all eagerness to go. He bounded up the stairs, two at a time, scarcely heeding the white-capped nurse, who hurried after him, softly calling:
“Not on ze rush, saire. You make ze rush, you gif madame ze start.”
“That’s so,” muttered Merry, checking himself at the head of the stairs and waiting for the cautious nurse. “Lizette, lead the way.”
The girl, stepping softly as a cat, gently opened a door for him, thus revealing a chamber where the light was softened by drawn window shades. Within that chamber Mrs. Merriwell reclined amid the snowy pillows of a broad bed.
“Ze mastaire is here, madame,” said the nurse, as Frank entered.
In a moment Merry was bending over his wife.
Something small and pink, in a soft white garment, nestled on her arm. It uttered a weak little cry—the cry of a new life in the great seething world—which was sweet music to the pale woman on the bed and the anxious man who bent over her.
“Oh, Frank,” murmured Inza, “he’s calling to you! He knows his father has come.”
Merriwell kissed her lightly, softly, tenderly. Then, with that indescribable light in his eyes, he gazed long and fondly at the babe.
“It’s a boy, Inza!” he murmured. “Just as you wished!”
“Just as I wished for your sake, Frank,” she said. “I knew you wanted a son. This is the happiest moment of my life, for I have given him to you.”
“A son!” exclaimed Frank softly, as he straightened up and threw his splendid shoulders back. “Why, think of it, Inza, I’m a father—and you are the dearest, sweetest, handsomest, noblest little mother in all the world!”
The nurse ventured to speak.
“Madame is so well! Madame is so strong! It is wonderful! It is grand!”
“You’ve been very good, Lizette,” said Inza. “We’ll not forget it.”
The nurse retired to the far end of the room, where she stood with her back toward the bed, pretending to inspect and admire a Donatello upon the wall.
Frank took the chair beside the bed and found Inza’s hand, which he clasped in a firm but gentle grasp.
“What shall we name him?” he asked.
“Why, haven’t you decided on a name, dear?”
“Without consulting you? Do you think I would do such a thing, Inza?”
“The name that pleases you will please me,” she declared. “What shall it be, my husband?”
“Why not the name of my most faithful friend? Why not call him Bartley Hodge Merriwell?”
“If that satisfies you, he shall be called by that name.”
Somehow Frank fancied he detected a touch of disappointment in her voice.
“But you, sweetheart—haven’t you a suggestion to make?”
“If you would like me to make one.”
“You know I would, Inza.”
“Then let Hodge be his middle name. Let’s call him Frank Hodge Merriwell. The initials are the same as your own. Bart will be pleased, and to me the baby will be little Frank.”
“Fine!” laughed Merry, in great satisfaction. “That is settled. That shall be his name. Hello, there, Frank Merriwell, the younger! I’ll make an athlete of you, you rascal! I’ll give you such advantages to start with as I never had myself.”
“No matter what you give him, no matter what you do for him,” murmured the happy mother, “he can never become a better or nobler man than his father.”
Frank kissed her again.


CHAPTER II.

THE BIRTHMARK.

“Where are Bart and Elsie, Frank?” asked Inza.
“They’re in the library.”
“I want them to come up. Tell Lizette to call them.”
The soft-footed nurse flitted from the room, and a few moments later Elsie Bellwood and Bart Hodge appeared. Hodge followed Elsie with an air of reluctance and confusion, which caused Inza to smile.
In a moment the golden-haired girl was bending over the bed, caressing her bosom friend, and murmuring soft words of affection.
“You’re such a brave, brave woman, Inza!” she exclaimed. “Oh, you make me feel like a coward!”
“Come here, Hodge,” urged Frank, drawing his friend round to the other side of the bed. “Here’s the boy. Here he is—Frank Hodge Merriwell.”
“Frank Hodge Merriwell?” echoed Bart, fumbling for Merry’s hand and grasping it with an almost savage grip. “You’ve given him my name?”
“We did it—both of us together, old man.”
“Merry, I—I don’t know what—to say,” stammered Bartley. “You’ve completely upset me. It’s the greatest honor——”
“There, there,” smiled Frank, “don’t splutter and mumble like that, old fellow. You don’t have to say a word. Just make a bow to the new-born king.”
Elsie was not one to gush, but, with clasped hands and flushed face, she expressed her admiration for the child.
“You ought to feel proud, Bart,” she said. “You ought to feel almost as proud as Frank.”
“Proud?” laughed Hodge. “Why, I—I—— My chest has expanded three inches in the last thirty seconds. Proud? I’ll bet my hat won’t fit me! He’s a star, the little rascal!”
“He has ze star on his left shouldaire,” said Lizette. “Shall I show it, madame? Shall I show zem ze beautiful mark?”
“Please do,” said Inza.
The nurse loosened the child’s clothes and exposed the small, shapely shoulder. There, at the very base of the arm, was a small, perfectly formed pink, five-cornered star.
“I was right!” cried Hodge. “There’s been a wonderful addition to the universe! A new star has risen!”
“It’s a birthmark,” said Frank.
“Oh, isn’t it very strange!” breathed Elsie. “It gives me a superstitious feeling of awe. It seems to me that he is marked by fate to be something grand and wonderful.”
“It was so good of you, Elsie, to come to me when I wanted you,” breathed Inza. “And Hodge—he traveled so far.”
“Oh, everything is coming as smoothly as possible at the mines,” declared Bart. “There’s a first-class foreman at both the Queen Mystery and the San Pablo. I could leave as well as not, and the old trains couldn’t run fast enough to bring me here after I received the wire from Frank, saying that Elsie would be here. You bet I was glad to shake the alkali dust out of my clothes.”
“You’ve done great things for me at the mines, Bart,” said Merry. “Everything now seems to be going right for me everywhere in the world. The Central Sonora Railroad is practically completed, and the San Pablo is paying enormously. But these are not things to speak of on an occasion like this.”
After a few minutes Bart and Elsie retired, the nurse took the baby, and Frank lingered a while longer at the side of his wife.
On returning to the library, Elsie stood at one of the large windows and looked out upon the grounds and across the broad road toward the handsome buildings of Farnham Hall. There was a strange expression of mingled happiness and regret on her fair face. Something like a mist filled her eyes.
Hodge came up behind her and put his arms round her.
“A penny for your thoughts, Elsie,” he said.
“I don’t think I could express them in words,” she confessed. “Do you think me a jealous person, Bart?”
“Jealous?” he exclaimed. “Far from it!”
“But I am—I’m jealous. I’m dying of envy.”
“You—you jealous—of whom?”
“Inza. Look how all the best things of life have come to her. She has a grand husband, who is doing a magnificent and noble work. Look at those splendid buildings. Every one acknowledges now that Frank has done and is doing more for the upbuilding and the uplifting of American boys than any person has ever before done in all history. Inza is his wife, and they have a son.”
Bart’s arms dropped at his sides, and he turned away.
In surprise, Elsie turned and saw him move from her. In a moment she had him by the arm.
“What is it, Bart?” she exclaimed, in dismay.
He shook his head, seeming unable to speak.
“Tell me what it is. Tell me what I did to hurt you,” she commanded.
He faced her again, looking deep into her blue eyes.
“You called up the past, Elsie,” he said, in a low tone. “I can’t forget that once I thought Frank loved you—and you loved him. You’ve confessed a feeling of jealousy toward Inza.”
“Oh, no, no, no!” she said quickly. “You didn’t understand me, Bart—truly you didn’t! It was not the sort of jealousy you mean. I’m not jealous of her because she is Frank’s wife—never! never!”
He seemed puzzled.
“Then what did you mean—what did you mean?” he asked.
“Why, can’t you understand? Can’t you see how it is? Fortune or fate, or whatever you may call it, has been against me—against us, Bart. Have you forgotten how we planned on a double wedding? Have you forgotten——”
“Forgotten?” cried Hodge. “I should say not! It was the bitterest disappointment of my life! You know I urged you, Elsie—I used every persuasion in my power.”
“But I could not consent. I was an invalid, and I feared my health would never return.”
“It has returned, little sweetheart. You’re well again. You’re stronger and handsomer than ever before in all your life. You put me off then, but you can’t do it now! I won’t let you!”
“You mean that——”
“I mean that when I left Mexico I made a resolve—I swore an oath. If I go back there—if Frank wants me to go—you will go with me.”
“Bart!”
“You must go with me,” he repeated.
“Must?”
“I have said it. Look here, Elsie, I know you’re not jealous of Inza because Merry is rich.”
“Oh, no, no!”
“As a rule, I have told you everything, my girl, but I now confess that there is one thing that I have not told you. I have a secret.”
“A secret from me?”
“Yes, a secret from you. You heard Frank state how well the San Pablo is paying. You heard him say that I had been faithful in my work for him. Perhaps you do not know that ere we entered into an agreement by which I took charge of his two mines and acted as overseer for both of them—perhaps you do not know that we nearly quarreled.”
Elsie looked astounded.
“Nearly quarreled?” she exclaimed.
“Yes.”
“Why, how could you?”
“Because he insisted on a certain condition in our agreement. Because he insisted that, after a lapse of time and at the completion of the Mexican railroad, I should accept a third interest in the San Pablo Mine. I fought against it. I told him it was not right. I even threatened to quit and have nothing to do with the work he wished me to perform. He was inexorable, unyielding. I pointed out that my service was not worth what he offered. I showed him that he could get experienced and expert men to do the work for an infinitesimal part of what he proposed to give me. He asserted that he was not giving me this merely for my labor, but on account of past favors and things I had done for him which could not be paid for in money. Even though I did not permit him to force me into consenting to take this share of his mine, I finally remained and did my best. I arrived in Bloomfield three days ago. The day I reached here he placed a paper in my hands. That paper makes me one-third owner of the San Pablo. I’m rich, Elsie. The future is assured for me and for you. That very day I went to the town clerk and had another paper made out. Here it is.”
He took a document from his pocket, opened it, and placed it in her hands.
“Why—why, what——” faltered Elsie.
“It’s a marriage license,” said Bart. “I’ve made all arrangements, and to-morrow, God willing, you and I will be made man and wife.”
It was even as Hodge had said. On the morrow, at her request, they were married in Inza’s chamber.


CHAPTER III.

ON THE VERANDA.

It was a beautiful sunny morning some three weeks later.
Inza and Elsie sat on the broad veranda of Merry Home, while Lizette, the nurse, trundled the baby up and down beneath the shady trees on the broad lawn.
Over at the east of Farnham Hall a group of laborers, among whom were fully twenty of the Farnham boys, were completing the foundations for Merriwell’s new manual-training school building.
A glimpse of the distant athletic ground showed a number of boys hard at work on the track and the baseball field.
There was a look of serene happiness on Inza’s face, while Elsie was positively rosy. After chatting a while, they sat some moments in silence, busy with their own thoughts. Finally their eyes met, and Inza laughed.
“No one would ever dream now that you were at one time determined to be an invalid, Elsie,” she said.
“Determined to be?” exclaimed Elsie. “Why do you use that word, Inza?”
“Why, you remember that I laughed at you—you remember I told you a hundred times that you would be well and strong again.”
“Yes, you were most encouraging, Inza, and I’ll never forget how faithfully you stuck by me. Still, there were reasons why I feared for my future health.”
“Silly reasons.”
“Oh, no, Inza; not silly. You can’t call them that. You know my mother was never strong, and she finally became a chronic invalid.”
“But your father——”
“Oh, he was a rugged man.”
“You know it’s said that girls generally take after their fathers and boys after their mothers.”
“But in my case it was different. A thousand times my father told me how much I looked like my mother. I had a picture of her, and I could see I was becoming more and more like her every day.”
“You’re a person who worries, Elsie. When things are not going just right you give yourself over to fears for the future. I have absolute courage and faith.”
“Oh, I know my failing,” admitted the golden-haired bride. “You and Frank were made for each other. You’re both courageous and trustful. Frank has done marvels for Bart in the way of giving him unwavering confidence and courage. You know Bart used to be quick-tempered, resentful, and inclined to brood. He has learned, through Frank’s example, to overcome such failings, and he’s now almost as confident and optimistic as Frank himself. I think Bart will help me in that respect.”
“We’re both extremely fortunate,” said Inza gravely. “If other girls could have such good fortune, this world would be a happy place. You are going to stay with us this summer?”
“Oh, I don’t know. Bart thinks it his duty to return to the mines. If he goes, I shall go with him.”
“But Frank says Bart will not be needed there for three months, at least. You’re not going to settle down to live in Arizona or Mexico, Elsie?”
“Oh, I don’t expect we’ll live there all our lives,” was the smiling answer. “But while duty keeps my husband out there, I shall remain with him.”
“That’s fine—that’s splendid! But Frank says there is no reason why Bart should spend more than five or six months of the year at the mines. Frank wants you to have a home in the East—here in Bloomfield.”
“Oh, I hope we may!” cried Elsie. “I’m sure Bart would like that.”
“Then you’d better make your plans for it. There’s a fine building lot down the road, and Frank owns it. You know you were married so suddenly we had no opportunity to make you a wedding present. If you can induce Bart to build, Frank and I have decided to give you that lot as a wedding present.”
Elsie sprang up, her eyes dancing, flung her arms round Inza’s neck, and kissed her repeatedly.
“It’s too much—too much!” she cried.
For a few moments their words and laughter were mingled in such confusion that the record would produce a senseless jumble. Finally Elsie sat down, appearing utterly overcome.
“Oh, what a glorious world!” she murmured. “What a grand, inexpressible thing real true friendship is! Still, such a gift is——”
“Now don’t feel that this is a case of charity,” laughed Inza. “I want you here—we want you here. Bart doesn’t need charity. His interest in the San Pablo makes him independent. He could buy a building lot a

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