Chats on Household Curios

Chats on Household Curios

Author:
Fred. W. Burgess
Author:
Fred. W. Burgess
Format:
epub
language:
English

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Author: Burgess, Fred. W. (Frederick William), 1855-1945
Interior decoration
Antiques
Collectors and collecting
Chats on Household Curios

CHATS ON
HOUSEHOLD
CURIOS


BOOKS FOR COLLECTORS

With Frontispieces and many Illustrations
Large Crown 8vo, cloth.

CHATS ON ENGLISH CHINA.
By Arthur Hayden.

CHATS ON OLD FURNITURE.
By Arthur Hayden.

CHATS ON OLD PRINTS.
By Arthur Hayden.

CHATS ON COSTUME.
By G. Woolliscroft Rhead.

CHATS ON OLD LACE AND NEEDLEWORK.
By E. L. Lowes.

CHATS ON ORIENTAL CHINA.
By J. F. Blacker.

CHATS ON OLD MINIATURES.
By J. J. Foster, F.S.A.

CHATS ON ENGLISH EARTHENWARE.
By Arthur Hayden.

CHATS ON AUTOGRAPHS.
By A. M. Broadley.

CHATS ON PEWTER.
By H. J. L. J. Massé, M.A.

CHATS ON POSTAGE STAMPS.
By Fred. J. Melville.

CHATS ON OLD JEWELLERY AND TRINKETS.
By MacIver Percival.

CHATS ON COTTAGE AND FARMHOUSE FURNITURE.
By Arthur Hayden.

CHATS ON OLD COINS.
By Fred. W. Burgess.

CHATS ON OLD COPPER AND BRASS.
By Fred. W. Burgess.

CHATS ON HOUSEHOLD CURIOS.
By Fred. W. Burgess.

In Preparation.
CHATS ON BARGAINS.
By Charles E. Jerningham.

CHATS ON JAPANESE PRINTS.
By Arthur Davison Ficke.

CHATS ON OLD CLOCKS AND WATCHES.
By Arthur Hayden.

CHATS ON OLD SILVER.
By Arthur Hayden.

LONDON: T. FISHER UNWIN.
NEW YORK: F. A. STOKES COMPANY.


FIG. 1.—OLD FIREPLACE, SHOWING SUSSEX BACK, ANDIRONS, AND TRIVET.

Frontispiece.


Chats on
Household Curios

BY

FRED. W. BURGESS

AUTHOR OF “CHATS ON OLD COINS,” “CHATS ON OLD
COPPER AND BRASS,” ETC.

WITH 94 ILLUSTRATIONS

LONDON
T. FISHER UNWIN
ADELPHI TERRACE


First published in 1914
(All rights reserved)


PREFACE

There is a peculiar charm about the relics found in an old home—a home from which many generations of fledglings have flown. As each milestone in family history is passed some once common object of use or ornament is dropped by the way. Such interesting mementoes of past generations accumulate, and in course of time the older ones become curios.
It is to create greater interest in these old-world odds and ends—some of trifling value to an outsider, others of great intrinsic worth—that this book has been written. The love of possession is to some possessors the chief delight; to others knowledge of the original purposes and uses of the objects acquired affords still greater pleasure. My intention has been rather to assist the latter class of collectors than to facilitate the mere assemblage of additional stores of curiosities. It is truly astonishing how rapidly the common uses of even household furnishings and culinary utensils are forgotten when they are superseded by others of more modern type.
The modern art of to-day and the revival of the much older furniture of the past have driven out the household gods of intermediate dates, and it is in that period intervening between the two extremes that most of the household curios reviewed in this work are found. Although many of the finest examples of household curios are now in museums, private collectors often possess exceptional specimens, and sometimes own the most representative groups of those things upon which they have specialized.
The examples in this book have been drawn from various sources. As in “Chats on Old Copper and Brass” (which may almost be regarded as a companion work), the illustrations are taken from photographs of typical museum curios and objects in private collections, or have been specially sketched by my daughter, who has had access to many interesting collections, to the owners of which I am indebted for the illustrations I am able to make use of.
My thanks are due to the Directors of the British Museum, who have allowed their printers, the University Press, Oxford, to supply electros of some exceptional objects now in the Museum; also to the Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, at South Kensington; and the Director of the London Museum, now located at Stafford House.
Dr. Hoyle, the Director of the National Museum of Wales, at Cardiff, has most kindly had specially prepared for this work quite a number of photographs of very uncommon household curios. The Curator of the Hull Museum has loaned blocks, and photographs have been sent by Messrs. Egan and Co., Ltd., of Cork; Mr. Wayte, of Edenbridge; and Mr. Phillips, of the Manor House, Hitchin. To Mr. Evans, of Nailsea Court, Somerset, I am indebted for the loan of his unrivalled collection of ancient nutcrackers, some of which have been sketched for reproduction. I have also made use of examples in the collections of private friends, and illustrated some of my own household curios, many of them family relics.
The story of domestic curios is made the more useful by these illustrations, and also by references to well-known collections. There is much to admire in the once common objects of the home, now curios, and it is in the hope that some may be led to appreciate more the antiques with which they are familiar that these pages have been penned. If that is achieved my object will have been accomplished.
FRED. W. BURGESS.
London, 1914.


CONTENTS

PAGE
PREFACE 7
CHAPTER I
THE LOVE OF THE ANTIQUE 19
No place like home—Curios in the making—The influence of prevailing styles—A cultivated taste.
CHAPTER II
THE INGLE SIDE 33
Fire-making appliances—Tinder boxes—The fireplace—Andirons and fire-dogs—Sussex backs—Fireirons and fenders—Trivets and stools—Bellows.
CHAPTER III
THE LIGHTS OF FORMER DAYS 59
Rushlights and holders—Candles, moulds, and boxes—Snuffers, trays, and extinguishers—Oil lamps—Lanterns.
CHAPTER IV
TABLE APPOINTMENTS 77
Cutlery: Knives, forks, and spoons—Salt cellars—Cruet stands—Punch and toddy—Porringers and cups—Trays and waiters—The tea table—Cream jugs—Sugar tongs and nippers—Caddies—Cupids—Nutcrackers—Turned woodware.
CHAPTER V
THE KITCHEN 121
The kitchen grate—Boilers and kettles—Grills and gridirons—Cooking utensils—Warming pans.
CHAPTER VI
HOME ORNAMENTS 147
Mantelpiece ornaments—Vases—Derbyshire Spars—Jade or spleen stone—Wood carvings—Old gilt.
CHAPTER VII
GLASS AND ENAMELS 173
Waterford, Bristol, and Nailsea—Ornaments of glass—Enamels on metal.
CHAPTER VIII
LEATHER AND HORN 185
Spanish leather—Cuir boulli work—Tapestry and upholstery—Leather bottles and drinking vessels—Leather curios—Shoes—Horn work.
CHAPTER IX
THE TOILET TABLE 199
The table and its secrets—Combs—Patch boxes—Enamelled objects—Perfume boxes and holders—Dressing cases—Scratchbacks—Toilet chatelaines—Locks of hair—Jewel cabinets.
CHAPTER X
THE OLD WORKBOX 223
Spinning wheels—Materials and work—Little accessories—Cutlery—Quaint woodwork—The needlewoman—Old samplers.
CHAPTER XI
THE LIBRARY 251
From cover to cover—Old scrap books—Almanacs—The writing table.
CHAPTER XII
THE SMOKER’S CABINET 269
Old pipes—Pipe racks—Tobacco boxes—Smokers’ tongs and stoppers—Snuff boxes and rasps.
CHAPTER XIII
LOVE TOKENS AND LUCKY EMBLEMS 281
Amulets—Horse trappings—Emblems of luck—Love spoons—Glass curios.
CHAPTER XIV
THE MARKING OF TIME 295
Clocks—Watches—Watch keys—Watch stands.
CHAPTER XV
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 309
Early examples—Whistles and pipes—Violins and harps.
CHAPTER XVI
PLAY AND SPORT 319
Dolls—Toys—Old games—Outdoor amusements—Relics of sport.
CHAPTER XVII
MISCELLANEOUS 337
Dower chests—Medicine chests—Old lacquer—The tool chest—Egyptian curios—Ancient spectacles—Curious chinaware—Garden curios—The mounting of curios—Obsolete household names.
INDEX 357

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

FIG.
1. OLD FIREPLACE, SHOWING SUSSEX BACK, ANDIRONS, AND TRIVET Frontispiece
PAGE
2. ANDIRONS WITH RATCHETS 27
3. ORNAMENTED CRESSET DOGS 27
4. TELESCOPIC RUSH AND CANDLE HOLDER 27
5. RATCHET RUSH AND CANDLE HOLDER 27
6. ANCIENT ROMAN FIRE-DOG 37
7. SUSSEX GRATE BACK, DATED 1588 37
8. THREE SINGLE DOGS OR ANDIRONS 45
9. PAIR OF DATED SUSSEX ANDIRONS (1625) 45
10. PAIR OF SUSSEX ANDIRONS 45
11. SUSSEX BACK WITH ROYAL EMBLEMS 51
12. SUSSEX BACK WITH ARMS AND ROYAL INITIALS 51
13. FINE CARVED WALNUT WOOD BELLOWS 55
14. THREE RUSHLIGHT HOLDERS 63
15. THREE VARIETIES OF OLD OIL LAMPS 63
16. TWO WALNUT WOOD FLOOR-CANDLESTICKS 69
17. FINE PAIR OF ANCIENT SNUFFERS 73
18. HANDSOMELY DECORATED KNIFE CASE AND CONTENTS 81
19. KNIFE, FORK, AND SPOON 87
20. PAIR OF DECORATED SPOONS 93
21. TWO WOODEN CUPS 101
22. WOODEN FLAGON, WITH COPPER BANDS 101
23. A COCOANUT CUP (SILVER-MOUNTED) 101
24. A COCOANUT CUP (SILVER-MOUNTED) 101
25. COCOANUT FLAGON 101
26. EARLY ENGLISH BRONZE EWER 109
27. INSCRIBED SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY WOOD DRINKING CUP 115
28-30. EARLY CARVED WOOD NUTCRACKERS 115
31-34. MEDIÆVAL WOOD NUTCRACKERS 119
35-39. EARLY STEEL AND BRASS NUTCRACKERS 119
40. TWO ANTIQUE WARMING PANS 124
41. WELSH KITCHEN FIREPLACE 124
42. MECHANICAL ROASTING JACKS 127
43-46. GRIDIRONS SHOWING FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN DESIGN 131
47 AND 48. TWO WOODEN FOOD BOXES 135
49. A COLLECTION OF IRON FAT BOATS AND GREASE PANS 135
50. WOODEN COFFEE CRUSHERS AND PESTLES AND MORTAR 139
51. APPLE SCOOPS OF BONE 139
52. WOODEN PIGGINS AND PORRIDGE BOWL 143
53. WOODEN PLATTER, BOWL, AND SPOONS 143
54. BRASS CHIMNEY ORNAMENT (ONE OF A PAIR) 151
55. BLACK AND GOLD DERBYSHIRE MARBLE VASE 155
56. TEMPLE GUARDIAN, CARVED FROM THE GNARLED ROOT OF A TREE 159
57. CARVED PLAQUE STAND 163
58 AND 59. MINIATURE COPPER AND SILVER KETTLES 167
60. MINIATURE IVORY COFFEE BOILER 167
61. TWO OLD-GILT JEWELLED ORNAMENTS 167
62. THREE FINE OLD IVORIES 171
63. BATTERSEA ENAMELS 179
64. ANTIQUE DRESSING OR TOILET GLASS 202
65. THREE OLD SCRATCHBACKS 209
66. SILVER CHATELAINE TOILET INSTRUMENTS 209
67. ANOTHER CHATELAINE SET 209
68. FINE ORIENTAL LACQUERED BOX 217
69. SMALL LACQUER CABINET 217
70. A PAGODA-SHAPED CASKET 217
71. DECORATED JEWEL CASE 217
72. OLD SPINNING WHEEL 227
73. SPINNING WHEEL 233
74. OLD LACE BOBBINS 233
75. OLD PIN POPPETS AND ANCIENT PINS 237
76. THREE OLD WORKBOXES 243
77. OLD WORKBOX FITTINGS 247
78. ANCIENT CLOG ALMANAC 257
79. OLD COIN TESTER 265
80. MINIATURE SOUVENIR ALMANAC 265
81. ANCIENT WRITING SET 265
82. THREE CURIOUS PIPE-STOPPERS 275
83. BRASS TOBACCO BOX 275
84. COLLECTION OF HARNESS AMULETS AND TEAM BELLS 285
85. OLD WELSH LOVE SPOONS 291
86. FINE GOTHIC FRENCH CLOCK 299
87. SPECIMENS OF OLD WATCH KEYS 303
88. TWO ANTIQUE WATCH CASES 303
89. OLD SPINET 315
90. CURIOUS TYPES OF WHISTLES 323
91. QUAINT OLD TOY 323
92. A POWDER TESTER 335
93. A PRIMING FLASK 335
94. OLD POWDER FLASKS 343

I

THE LOVE
OF THE
ANTIQUE


CHAPTER I

THE LOVE OF THE ANTIQUE

No place like home—Curios in the making—The influence of prevailing styles—A cultivated taste.

There is an inborn love of the antique in most men, although some are fond of asserting that their interests are bound up in the modern, and that they have no time to devote to the study of the antiquities of past ages or the things that were fashionable in times long past. Yet most people, when their secret longings are analysed, are found to have an ad

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