A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 4

A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 4

Author:
Henry Charles Lea
Author:
Henry Charles Lea
Format:
epub
language:
English

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Author: Lea, Henry Charles, 1825-1909
Inquisition — Spain
A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 4


Every attempt has been made to replicate the original book as printed. Some typographical errors have been corrected. A list follows the text.
No attempt has been made to correct or normalize words in Spanish or other languages.
(etext transcriber’s note)

THE INQUISITION OF SPAIN

WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR
 
A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. In three volumes, octavo.
A HISTORY OF AURICULAR CONFESSION AND INDULGENCES IN THE LATIN CHURCH. In three volumes, octavo.
AN HISTORICAL SKETCH OF SACERDOTAL CELIBACY IN THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. Third edition. (In preparation.)
A FORMULARY OF THE PAPAL PENITENTIARY IN THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY. One volume, octavo. (Out of print.)
SUPERSTITION AND FORCE. Essays on The Wager of Law, The Wager of Battle, The Ordeal, Torture. Fourth edition, revised. In one volume, 12mo.
STUDIES IN CHURCH HISTORY. The Rise of the Temporal Power, Benefit of Clergy, Excommunication, The Early Church and Slavery. Second edition. In one volume, 12mo.
CHAPTERS FROM THE RELIGIOUS HISTORY OF SPAIN, CONNECTED WITH THE INQUISITION. Censorship of the Press, Mystics and Illuminati, Endemoniadas, El Santo Niño de la Guardia, Brianda de Bardaxí.
THE MORISCOS OF SPAIN. THEIR CONVERSION AND EXPULSION. In one volume, 12mo.

 

A HISTORY
OF THE
INQUISITION OF SPAIN

BY
HENRY CHARLES LEA. LL.D.

———
IN FOUR VOLUMES
———

VOLUME IV.

———

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
LONDON: MACMILLAN & CO., Ltd. 1922
All rights reserved

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Copyright, 1907,
By THE MACMILLAN COMPANY.
——
Set up and electrotyped. Published January, 1907.

CONTENTS OF VOL. IV.

BOOK VIII—SPHERES OF ACTION (Continued).
Chapter V—Mysticism.
PAGE
Antiquity of Mystic Aspirations 1
Dangers—Impeccability—Independence 2
      Illuminism and Quietism—Confusion with Protestantism—Uncertainty as to Source of Visions—Contempt for Theology 4
Development in Spain 6
Commencement of Persecution—The Mystics of Guadalajara 7
Francisca Hernández 9
María Cazalla—The Group in Toledo—Ignatius Loyola 13
Archbishop Carranza—San Francisco de Borja—Luis de Granada—the Jesuits 15
Fray Alonso de la Fuente—his struggle with Jesuitism 19
The Alumbrados of Llerena 23
Hostility of the Inquisition to Mysticism 24
Padre Gerónimo de la Madre de Dios 26
Mística Theología of Fernando de Caldera 29
Prosecution of the Mystics of Seville—Condemnation of Alumbrado Errors 29
Illuminism becomes formal Heresy—Procedure 34
Madre Luisa de Carrion 36
Influence of Mystics—Sor María de Agreda 39
Mysticism in Italy—Canon Pandolfo Ricasoli—The Impostor Giuseppe Borri—The Sequere me 42
      The Pelagini of Lombardy 46
      Miguel de Molinos—Condemnation of Mysticism 49
      The Beccarellisti 61
Mysticism in France—Condemnation of Fénelon 62
Molinism in Spain—Persecution 68
Bishop Toro of Oviedo 71
Madre Agueda de Luna 76
Fray Eusebio de Villaroja—abusive Methods 77
Mysticism regarded as delusion 79
Prevalence of Imposture 81
      Magdalena de la Cruz 82
      Madre María de la Visitacion 83
      Variable Treatment of Imposture 86
      The Beata Dolores—The Beata de Cuenca—The Beata Clara 89
      Sor Patrocinio 92
Chapter VI—Solicitation
Frequency of Seduction in the Confessional 95
Invention of the Confessional Stall 96
Leniency of Spiritual Courts 97
The Inquisition indirectly seeks Jurisdiction 98
Paul IV and Pius IV grant Jurisdiction 99
The Regular Clergy endeavor to obtain Exemption 100
Legislation of Gregory XV—Struggle with Bishops over Jurisdiction 100
Solicitation included in Edict of Faith 105
Difficulty of inducing Women to denounce Culprits 106
Solicitation a technical Offence against the Sacrament, not against Morals 109
Difficulty of practical Definition 110
Passive Solicitation 111
Absolution of the Partner in Guilt 113
Facility of evading Penalty 114
Flagellation—Connection with Illuminism 116
Procedure—Tenderness for Delinquents 119
      Two Denunciations required 123
      Registers kept of Soliciting Confessors 125
Moderation of Penalties 126
Self-Denunciation—It finally secures immunity 130
Statistics of Cases—Predominance of the Regular Orders 134
Chapter VII—Propositions
Growth of Jurisdiction over Utterances, public and private 138
Influence of habitual Delation 138
Danger incurred by trivial Remarks 140
Severity of Penalties—Question of Belief and Intention 142
Special Propositions—Marriage better than Celibacy 144
      Fornication between the Unmarried no Sin 145
Theological Propositions—Case of Fray Luis de Leon 148
      Scholastic Disputation, its Dangers 150
      Fray Luis accused of Disrespect for the Vulgate 151
      Arrested and imprisoned March 27, 1572 153
      Endless Debates over multiplying Articles of Accusation 154
      Vote in discordia, September 18, 1576 156
      Acquitted by the Suprema, December 7, 1576 157
      Second trial in 1582 for Utterances in Debate—Acquittal 159
Francisco Sánchez, his Contempt for Theology 162
      He is summoned and reprimanded, September 24, 1584 164
      Again summoned and imprisoned, September 25, 1600—his Death 166
Fray Joseph de Sigüenza—Plot against him in his Order 168
      Prefers Trial by the Inquisition—is acquitted 170
Case of Padre Alonso Romero, S. J. 171
Prosecutions of incautious Preachers 172
Increasing Proportion of Cases of Propositions, continuing to the last 176
Chapter VIII—Sorcery and Occult Arts.
Accumulation of Superstitious Beliefs in Spain 179
Toleration in the early Middle Ages 180
John XXII orders Persecution of Sorcery 181
Persistent Toleration in Spain 182
The Inquisition obtains Jurisdiction 183
Question as to Heresy—Pact with the Demon 184
The Demon omnipresent in Superstitious Practices—Hermaphrodites 186
Belief thus strengthened in Divination and Magic 189
The Inquisition thus obtains exclusive Jurisdiction 190
Astrology—Its Teaching suppressed in the University of Salamanca 192
Procedure—Directed to prove Pact with the Demon 195
Penalties—Less severe than in secular Courts 197
Rationalistic Treatment in Portuguese Inquisition 202
Prosecuted as a Reality in Spain, to the last 203
Increase in the Number of Cases 204
Belief remains undiminished to the present time 205
Chapter IX—Witchcraft.
Distinctive Character of Witchcraft—The Sabbat 206
Origin in the 14th Century—Rapid Development in the 15th 207
Genesis of Belief in the Sabbat—The Canon Episcopi 208
Discussion as to Delusion or Reality—Witch-Burnings 209
Congregation of 1526 deliberates on the Subject 212
Witch Epidemics—Active Persecution 214
The Suprema restrains the Zeal of the Tribunals 216
Enlightened Instructions 219
Auto-suggestive Hypnotism of confessed Witches 220
Conflict with secular Courts over Jurisdiction 222
Lenient Punishment 223
Retrogression—The Logroño Auto of 1610 225
Revulsion of Feeling—Pedro de Valencia 228
Alonso de Salazar Frias commissioned to investigate 230
His rationalistic Report 231
Instructions of 1614 virtually put an end to Persecution 235
Persistent Belief—Torreblanca 239
Witchcraft Epidemics disappear 240
Witchcraft in the Roman Inquisition 242
The Witchcraft Craze throughout Europe 246
Chapter X—Political Activity.
Assertion that the Inquisition was a political Instrument 248
No Trace of its Agency in the Development of Absolutism 249
Rarely called upon for extraneous Service 251
Case of Antonio Pérez 253
      Assassination of Juan de Escobedo 254
      Pérez replaced by Granvelle—is imprisoned—escapes to Saragossa—is condemned in Madrid 255
      Futile Attempts to prosecute him before the Justicia of Aragon 258
      The Inquisition called in and prosecutes him for Blasphemy 258
      He is surrendered to the Tribunal—the City rises and rescues him 259
      Philip’s Army occupies Saragossa—Pérez escapes to France—Execution of the Justicia Lanuza 263
      Prosecutions by the Inquisition in opposition to the policy of Philip II—Auto de fe of October 20, 1592 267
      Córtes of Tarazona in 1592 curtail the Liberties of Aragon 269
      Death of Pérez in 1611—his memory absolved in 1615 272
Sporadic Cases of Intervention by the Inquisition 273
It is used in the War of Succession 275
Gradually becomes subservient under the Bourbons 276
Is a political Instrument under the Restoration 277
Sometimes used to enforce secular Law—The Export of Horses 278
Chapter XI—Jansenism.
Indefinable Character of Jansenism, except as opposed to Ultramontanism 284
Struggle in Spanish Flanders 286
Quarrel with Rome over the Condemnation of Cardinal Noris in the Index of 1747 288
Opposition to Ultramontanism and Jesuitism persecuted as Jansenism 292
Expulsion of the Jesuits—Reaction under Godoy 294
Chapter XII—Free-Masonry.
Development of Masonry—Condemned by the Holy See 298
Persecuted by the Inquisition and the Crown 300
It becomes revolutionary in Character 303
Persecution under the Restoration 304
Its pernicious Activity in the Constitutional Period 306
Chapter XIII—Philosophism.
Growth of Incredulity towards the End of the Eighteenth Century 307
Olavide selected as a Victim 308
Impression produced by his Trial 311
Struggle between Conservatism and Progress 312
Chapter XIV—Bigamy.
Assumption of Jurisdiction over Bigamy 316
Based on inferential Heresy 318
The Civil and Spiritual Courts strive to preserve their Jurisdiction 319
Penalties 321
Contest over Jurisdiction revived—Carlos III subdivides it into three 323
The Inquisition reasserts it under the Restoration 326
Number of Cases 327
Chapter XV—Blasphemy.
Distinction between heretical and non-heretical Blasphemy 328
Con

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