A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 2

A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 2

Author:
Henry Charles Lea
Author:
Henry Charles Lea
Format:
epub
language:
English

%title插图%num
Author: Lea, Henry Charles, 1825-1909
Inquisition — Spain
A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 2


Every attempt has been made to replicate the original book as printed. Some typographical errors have been corrected. A list follows the text.
(etext transcriber’s note)

THE INQUISITION OF SPAIN

WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR
 
A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. In three volumes, octavo.
A HISTORY OF AURICULAR CONFESSION AND INDULGENCES IN THE LATIN CHURCH. In three volumes, octavo.
AN HISTORICAL SKETCH OF SACERDOTAL CELIBACY IN THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. Third edition. (In preparation.)
A FORMULARY OF THE PAPAL PENITENTIARY IN THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY. One volume, octavo. (Out of print.)
SUPERSTITION AND FORCE. Essays on The Wager of Law, The Wager of Battle, The Ordeal, Torture. Fourth edition, revised. In one volume, 12mo.
STUDIES IN CHURCH HISTORY. The Rise of the Temporal Power, Benefit of Clergy, Excommunication, The Early Church and Slavery. Second edition. In one volume, 12mo.
CHAPTERS FROM THE RELIGIOUS HISTORY OF SPAIN, CONNECTED WITH THE INQUISITION. Censorship of the Press, Mystics and Illuminati, Endemoniadas, El Santo Niño de la Guardia, Brianda de Bardaxí.
THE MORISCOS OF SPAIN. THEIR CONVERSION AND EXPULSION. In one volume, 12mo.

 

A HISTORY
OF THE
INQUISITION OF SPAIN

BY
HENRY CHARLES LEA. LL.D.

———
IN FOUR VOLUMES
———

VOLUME II.

———

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
LONDON: MACMILLAN & CO., Ltd. 1922
All rights reserved

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Copyright, 1906,
By THE MACMILLAN COMPANY.
——
Set up and electrotyped. Published January, 1906.

CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

BOOK III—JURISDICTION.
Chapter I—Heresy.
  PAGE
Importance attached to Unity of Belief 1
Popular Abhorrence of Heresy 2
Limitations of Inquisitorial Jurisdiction 3
Classification of Heresy—Heresy both a sin and a crime 4
Original Episcopal Jurisdiction 5
The Inquisition obtains exclusive Jurisdiction 6
Episcopal Concurrence—It is merely formal 11
Jurisdiction over the Forum of Conscience 10
The Question of Papal Indulgences 24
Extension of Exclusive Jurisdiction 26
Chapter II—The Regular Orders.
The Regular Clergy claim exemption from the Inquisition 29
Fluctuations of the Struggle—the Inquisition triumphs 31
Resistance of the Jesuits—their Defeat 33
Jurisdiction assumed in Quarrels between the Orders 37
Chapter III—Bishops.
Torquemada vainly seeks Jurisdiction over Bishops 41
Cases of Dávila of Segovia and Aranda of Calahorra 42
Case of Acuña of Zamora 45
Jurisdiction conferred personally on Inquisitor-general Manrique 44
      Case of Archbishop Carranza of Toledo 45
      Inquisitor-general Valdés falls into disfavor 46
      Seeks to re-establish himself by prosecuting Carranza 48
      Carranza’s Orthodoxy—Melchor Cano 49
      Carranza’s Commentaries on the Catechism 54
      Royal and Papal Assent obtained for the Prosecution 56
      Carranza’s Arrest and Incarceration, Aug. 22, 1559 65
      He recuses Valdés and two other Judges 69
      Procrastination—Trial begins July 30, 1561 71
      Continued Delays—Intervention of Council of Trent in 1563 73
      Fruitless Efforts of Pius IV to expedite the trial 75
      Pius V evokes the Case to Rome 77
      Carranza reaches Rome May 28, 1567—Trial recommenced 79
      Gregory XIII recommences the Trial in 1572 81
      Sentence rendered April 24, 1576 82
      Carranza’s Death, May 2d—Estimates of him 84
Jurisdiction claimed over Bishops 87
Cases of Toro of Oviedo and Queipo of Mechoacan 88
Chapter IV—The Edict of Faith.
Its Effectiveness in stimulating Denunciations 91
Its comprehensive Details 93
Its Anathema 95
Popular Training in Delation 99
Chapter V—Appeals to Rome.
Supremacy of Papal Jurisdiction 103
Conversos purchase Letters of Pardon from the Holy See 104
Ferdinand and the Inquisition disregard them 105
Papal Pardons claimed to be good in the Judicial Forum 107
Struggle between Spain and Rome—Pardons sold and revoked 108
Citation to Rome of Inquisitorial Officials 118
Tergiversations of the Curia 120
Charles V carries on the Struggle 123
He obtains exclusive Appellate Jurisdiction for the Inquisitor-general 126
But the Curia still entertains Appeals 128
Friction continued under Philip II and Philip III 129
Philip IV enforces surrender of papal letters 132
Case of Gerónimo de Villanueva 133
      His connection with the Convent of San Placido 134
      He obtains an Acquittal from the Inquisition in 1632 136
      Arce y Reynoso reopens the Case in 1643 138
      Villanueva’s Sentence—His Appeal to Rome entertained 143
      Persistent Resistance of Philip IV 146
      Copies of the Papers sent to Rome in 1651 154
      Efforts to have them returned continued until 1660 157
Appeals to Rome forbidden under the Bourbons 159
BOOK IV—ORGANIZATION.
Chapter I—The Inquisitor-General and Supreme Council.
Commissions of Officials expire with the Inquisitor-general 161
Suprema at first merely a Consultative Body 162
Rapid Increase of its Functions 164
It becomes the ruling Power 167
Its struggle with Inquisitor-general Mendoza in the Case of Froilan Diaz 169
      Mendoza removes the opposing Members 174
      Philip V. decides in favor of the Suprema and of Froilan Diaz 177
The Suprema reduces the Tribunals to Subordination 179
It gradually intervenes in Sentences and Trials 181
It requires monthly Reports of current Business 183
Centralization becomes complete—The Tribunals are merely ministerial 185
Appellate Jurisdiction of Inquisitor-general and Suprema 187
Control over all Details of the Tribunals 189
Control over the Finances 190
Salaries and Perquisites of the Suprema 194
Its Enjoyment of Bull-fights 198
Its Revenues and Expenses 200
Chapter II—The Tribunal.
Gradual Delimitation into Districts 205
Organization of the Tribunal—Multiplication of Officials 208
Vain efforts to restrict the Number 211
Sale of Offices 212
Census of Officials in 1746 216
Hereditary Transmission of Office 218
Tenderness shown to official Malfeasance and its Results 223
Visitations or Inspections of the Tribunals 227
The Palace or Building of the Tribunal 230
The Personnel of the Tribunal—The Assessor 232
      The Inquisitors—Their Qualifications 233
      Their Duty of visiting their Districts 238
      The Promotor Fiscal or Prosecutor 241
      The Notaries or Secretaries 243
      The Alguazil 245
      The Nuncio, Portero and Gaoler 246
      The Physician, Surgeon and Steward 248
      Financial Officials 250
Salaries and Ayudas de Costa 251
The Records 255
Chapter III—Unsalaried Officials.
Calificadores or Censors 263
Consultors 266
Commissioners 268
Familiars 272
      Their excessive Numbers and Turbulence 274
      Qualifications prescribed 279
Organization of officials—Hermandad de San Pedro Martir 282
      Fernando VII makes it an Order of Knighthood 283
Chapter IV—Limpieza.
Origin of Limpieza or Purity of Blood 285
Distinction between Old and New Christians 286
The Religious Orders seek to exclude New Christians 287
New Christians excluded from Colleges 289
The Church of Toledo adopts a Statute of Limpieza 290
Limpieza enforced in the Observantine Franciscans 293
It becomes a Prerequisite in the Inquisition 294
Verification of Limpieza 295
Number of Generations required—Penitents of the Inquisition 297
Character of Investigation—It is a Source of Revenue 300
Perjury and Subornation 304
Futile Effort of Philip IV to diminish the Evils of Limpieza 307
Unfortunate Effects of the Proscription 308
It increases the Terror of the Inquisition 310
Rigidity relaxed under the Restoration 311
Remains of Prejudice in Majorca 312
BOOK V—RESOURCES.
Chapter I—Confiscation.
Necessity of Confiscation to support the Inquisition 315
Confiscation borrowed from the imperial Jurisprudence 316
Responsibility for it 317
Claims of the Church in Cases of Clerics 318
Division made with feudal Lords 319
Enforced on all reconciled or condemned Heretics 320
Methods to prevent Evasion 321
Commissions paid to Informers 323
Rapacious Practice of the Old Inquisition 325
The Question of Alienations and Creditors 326
The Question of Dowries 332
The Question of Conquests 334
Thoroughness of Confiscation—Provision for Children 335
Alienations subsequent to Commission of Heresy 339
Slaves of Confiscated Estates 339
Rigorous Collection of Debts 340
Routine of Business—Responsibility of Receivers 341
Hardships inflicted by Confiscation 349
Exclusive Jurisdiction of the Inquisition 349
Compositions for Confiscation 352
Losses and Dilapidation 363
Productiveness 367
Becomes Obsolete in the Eighteenth Century 370
Disposition made of the Proceeds 371
      Lavish Grants to Favorites 372
      Ferdinand’s Kindliness 378
      Reckless Grants by Charles V 380
Influence of Confiscation 386
Chapter II—Fines and Penances.
Pecuniary Penance 389
Distinguished from Confiscation 391
Sometimes substituted for Confiscation 394
Its Productiveness 396
Fines as Punishment 389
Chapter III—Dispensations.
Rehabilitation from Disabilities 401
Struggle between the Crown, the Inquisition and the Papacy 403
Sale of Commutation of Punishments 408
Download This eBook
This book is available for free download!

评论

A History of the Inquisition of Spain; vol. 2
Free Download
Free Book